Title: Further Fables for Our Time Author: Thurber, James Grover () Date of first has lighted our time, so that we can see where. Further Fables for Our Time has ratings and 13 reviews. Eleanor said: Anyone who has ever read anything by Thurber knows that he is perfect. If you h.. . Fables for Our Time and Famous Poems Illustrated has ratings and 30 reviews. Susan said: The world’s a fine and terrible place. Thurber approaches it.. .

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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. But anyway he Thurber, that is here continues the jajes, fooling no one by putting it in the form of fables. People who already know everything there is to know about people shouldn’t bother reading this book. Others need it badly. Hardcover1stpages. National Book Award Finalist for Fiction To see what your fbles thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Further Fables for Our Timeplease sign tables.

Be the first to ask a question about Further Fables for Our Time. Lists with This Book. Jun 04, Eleanor rated it it was amazing Shelves: Anyone who has ever read anything by Thurber knows that he is perfect.

FABLES FOR OUR TIME by James Thurber | Kirkus Reviews

If you haven’t read him, here is a short sample of his lovely quirky style: The Weaver and the Worm A weaver watched in wide-eyed wonder a silkworm spinning its cocoon in a white mulberry tree. Then the weaver and the silkworm went their separate ways, for each thought the other had insulted him. We Anyone who has ever read anything by Thurber knows that he is perfect. We live, man and worm, in a time when almost everything can mean almost anything, for this is the age of gobbledygook, doubletalk, and gudda.

A word to the wise is not sufficient if it doesn’t make any sense. View all 3 comments. All men should strive to learn before they die what they are running from, and to, and why. Jul 08, Robert rated it it was amazing Shelves: Modern day Aesop’s with an intellectual bent. Modern in this case being and intellectual being those who recognize both French and Latin quips.

Jun 06, Matt Piechocinski rated it it was amazing.

Questions?

I think my favorite fable was the one about the Mongoose. Jun 16, Ethan rated it it was amazing. Himarious and more modern than modern. His illustrations are also excellent. I laughed aloud several times.

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Fables for Our Time and Famous Poems Illustrated – Wikipedia

Dec 02, Matt Ely rated it really liked it Shelves: Best read in short bursts, this collection of Thurber’s fables, some more sincere than others, is certainly worthwhile. I thurbfr my favorite part might be how modern these lessons are, even after 50 years. It’s helpful to know that he found language in his time to be doubletalk, suspicious of truth. He also found turber, anti-nationalism, and individuality challenges that deserved comment. It is good for me to read the urgent wisdom of the recent past to make the stresses of the Best read in short bursts, this collection of Thurber’s fables, thurebr more sincere than others, is certainly worthwhile.

It is good for me to read the urgent wisdom of the recent past to make the stresses of the current day seem less unique. Nov 21, Ellice rated it really liked it Shelves: This is typical Thurber, at his witty best while writing and thurver very brief, animal-rich tume.

It’s both comforting and alarming how many of them ring true 60 years after their first publication, like “The Peacelike Mongoose,” in which a mongoose who doesn’t want to fight cobras is called “crazy,” “sick,” “a coward,” and “a mongoosexual.

You’ll have to read the book to find jamed what it is. Oct 16, Tyler Jones rated it really liked it Shelves: What makes Thurber so appealing to me, even more than his caustic view of human nature, is his ability to use the funniest words, and when the funniest word does not exist, invent it. These hilarious little fables are like a cross between Twain and Seuss, and still seem very relevant in our own nutty times.

Sep 23, Mallory rated it really liked it Shelves: This book has several different short stories which allows the reader to not get bored with just one story.

This book would be best for the intermediate and middle school grades and great for a read out loud during snack time. There is a moral at the end of each fable which would make for a great whole class discussion! Nov 12, Robin rated it really liked it Shelves: Wry and very clever. On Gutenberg with illustrations: After the all the Freemasonry and antisemitism of The Prague CemeteryI’m moving in a decidedly lighter direction with these fables by James Thurber Aug 21, Melora rated it liked it Shelves: Some gems, most just mildly amusing.

Brad Thompson rated it it was amazing Dec 20, Karolina rated it it was amazing Nov 13, His Girl Friday rated it liked it Jul 25, Mary rated it really liked it Jun 05, Paul rated it it was amazing Aug 24, Min Zhi Heng rated it liked it Feb 13, Dion Burn rated it really liked it Oct 10, Anna rated it liked it Mar 17, Marly Lemanski rated it liked it Sep 25, Jacquie Lyerly rated it liked it Nov 17, Jordanehorst rated it really liked it Nov 19, Shakeel Shafiq rated it it was amazing Feb 12, Tim rated it really liked it Feb 26, Michael Hoskin rated it really liked it Apr 13, Meromorphic rated it really liked it Feb 04, Chris Parker rated it really liked it Dec 02, Richard Watt rated it it was amazing Mar 07, There are no discussion topics on this book yet.

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Thurber was born in Columbus, Ohio to Charles L. Both of his parents greatly influenced his work. His father, a sporadically employed clerk and minor politician who dreamed of being a lawyer or an actor, is said to have been the inspiration for the small, timid protagonist typical of many of his stories. Thurber described his mother as a “born comedienne” and “one of the finest comic talents I think I have ever known.

Thurber had two brothers, William and Robert. Once, while playing a game of William Tell, his brother William shot James in the eye with an arrow. Because of the lack of medical technology, Thurber lost his eye.

This injury would later cause him to be almost entirely blind. During his childhood he was unable to participate in sports and activities because of his injury, and instead developed a creative imagination, which he shared in his writings. He never graduated from the University because his poor eyesight prevented him from taking a mandatory ROTC course. In he was posthumously awarded a degree. After this Thurber returned to Columbus, where he began his writing career as a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch from to During part of this time, he reviewed current books, films, and plays in a weekly column called “Credos and Curios,” a title that later would be given to a posthumous collection of his work.

Thurber also returned to Paris in this period, where he wrote for the Chicago Tribune and other newspapers. He joined the staff of The New Yorker in as an editor with the help of his friend and fellow New Yorker contributor, E. His career as a cartoonist began in when White found some of Thurber’s drawings in a trash can and submitted them for publication.

Thurber would contribute both his writings and his drawings to The New Yorker until the s. Thurber was married twice. InThurber married Althea Adams.

The marriage was troubled and ended in divorce in May Adams gave Thurber his only child, his daughter Rosemary.

Thurber remarried in June, to Helen Wismer.